Uh-oh

Yesterday my back was hurting in the morning. I don’t know if I slept on in wrong or if I twisted it the wrong way in an early-morning pond clean out, but it was stiff. Then around noon I sneezed. The pain in my back almost brought me to my knees. I didn’t think much of it, but a half hour later, I could hardly walk. Each step brought a fresh stab of pain in my back that made my knees buckle. After that I spent all day lying down.

Today I travel to Nebraska. I’m very worried. My back still hurts a lot. I seem to be able to at least walk this morning without stabs of pain, but I’ve twisted just the wrong way a few times and still feel those incredibly awful pains. So now besides worrying about crashing, I’m worried that I won’t be able to stay seated for the whole flight, or that once we land in Minneapolis I won’t be able to stand up, or that I’ll have to use the toilet and won’t be able to get up from it, or that I’ll lie down in the airport and not be able to stand. Dang.

I spent part of the day on the floor with my good friend Xbox.

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8 Responses to Uh-oh

  1. Lauren says:

    No!!!!! 🙁 This is monumentally awful! I’ll be praying for a painless trip for you. (It must really be bad – no photo of a flaming, crashing plane.)

  2. Michele says:

    Crap! I’m really sorry to hear about that. Ice it as soon as you can. Back pain is the worst! 🙁
    Maybe they can bump you to first class for free! 🙂

  3. Lloyd says:

    You should definitely get preferential boarding so as to not get jostled around. It will be you, a 6 year old kid and two old ladies in wheelchairs.

  4. Deanne says:

    It hurts so bad that he forgot the traditional airplane crash picture. Lauren, can you hook him up with a chiropractor or massage therapist or something?

  5. Peggy says:

    I’m wincing just reading your post…So, so sorry Brad. Load up on Ibuprofen, ice, & get a cool looking 4th of July cane.

    And having been there for the ‘sneeze’, I knew it was more than just a muscle…as Brad so bravely tried to pass it off as. I can read the face of back pain like no other. I’ve had that same stab of pain many, many times. Hey, I have some new vitamins that might help!

    • Carol says:

      True – and one knows one is aging when one’s back “goes out” more often than one does one’s self…not that I have any experience in this area…ahem…

      Brad, seriously – I’ve been praying since I read this. Immobility with or without pain while in transit is a b**** (bummer/bear/insert expletive here). I once had to drive to St. Louis to help care for my aunt who had just been released from the hospital when her two daughters had to go home to their own immediate family and the day before departure had managed to lock my back so badly doing a daily activity (details available upon request) that I could barely get into or out of the car I had to drive to get there. It made for an interesting trip and visit, but by the grace of God I made it and became great friends with blue ice for 20 minutes out of every waking hour.

      The good news: you are traveling to your family and friends – they will help care for you. Just let us know to which place flowers should be sent, ok?

  6. Karla says:

    Arron’s back started acting up right after Zeke was born. We were afraid another disc was going to rupture, so he went to his doctor and had all the usual tests.

    Long story short, he was sent to a pain doctor who did pulsed radiofrequency neurotomy on him. It’s a process of a couple of test runs and then the actual proceedure. He was lucky that the tests reset the nerve every time giving him a couple months of relief. Last week he finally had the actual treatment done and is feeling great.

    In the mean time, he found that Motrin really helped him with the pain. He would take 600 or 800 mg at a time (3 or 4 pills).

    You can read about what this proceedure is like here and here.

    I really think you should look into this. He’s been really happy with the results.

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